Ladies working in textiles. From tarquinium sanitatis. Wikipedia

The Silk Industries of Medieval Paris

At some point before the last decade of the thirteenth century a luxury silk cloth industry emerged in Paris. This gave rise to a substantial production as well as important work for women. Sharon Farmer tells the story in a new book out in November 2016

The Silk Industries of Medieval Paris. Artisanal Migration, Technological Innovation, and Gendered Experience
By Sharon Farmer
Series: A volume in the Middle Ages Series

ABSTRACT:

For more than one hundred years, from the last decade of the thirteenth century to the late fourteenth, Paris was the only western European town north of the Mediterranean basin to produce luxury silk cloth. What was the nature of the Parisian silk industry? How did it get there? And what do the answers to these questions tell us?

According to Sharon Farmer, the key to the manufacture of silk lies not just with the availability and importation of raw materials but with the importation of labor as well. Farmer demonstrates the essential role that skilled Mediterranean immigrants played in the formation of Paris’s population and in its emergence as a major center of luxury production. She highlights the unique opportunities that silk production offered to women and the rise of women entrepreneurs in Paris to the very pinnacles of their profession. The Silk Industries of Medieval Paris illuminates aspects of intercultural and interreligious interactions that took place in silk workshops and in the homes and businesses of Jewish and Italian pawnbrokers.

Drawing on the evidence of tax assessments, aristocratic account books, and guild statutes, Farmer explores the economic and technological contributions that Mediterranean immigrants made to Parisian society, adding new perspectives to our understanding of medieval French history, luxury trade, and gendered work.

TABLE OF CONTENTS:

Introduction
Chapter 1. Paris, City of Immigrants
Chapter 2. From Persian Cocoon to Soie de Paris: Trade Networks and Silk Techniques
Chapter 3. Immigrant Mercers and Silk Workers
Chapter 4. Gender, Work, and the Parisian Silk Industry
Chapter 5. Jews, Foreign Lombards, and Parisian Silk Women
Conclusion

Appendices:
1. Mediterranean Immigrants Paying Taxes as “Bourgeois of Paris” or Included on Parisian Guild Lists
2. Mercers in the Parisian Tax Assessments, Arranged by Neighborhood
3. Silk Weavers in the Parisian Tax Assessments
4. Silk Throwsters in the Parisian Tax Assessments
5. Ouvriers/Ouvrières de Soie in the Parisian Tax Assessments

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Sharon Farmer is Professor of History at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

FEATURED PHOTO:

Ladies working in textiles. From tarquinium sanitatis. Wikipedia

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