Ragnar Lodbrog dying in the Snake Pit

Minor Medieval News January 2017

Ever so often we stumble on some minor medieval news, which do not merit a full article, but nevertheless deserve a short notice. Here they are from January 2017

(Updated weekly)

DigiPal Recieves Award

DigiPal - Digital Resource and Database for Palaeography, Manuscript Studies and DiplomaticThe Medieval Academy Digital Humanities Prize has just been awarded to DigiPal: Digital Resource and Database of Manuscripts, Palaeography and Diplomatics. (London, 2011-14), , developed at the Department of Digital Humanities, King’s College London, and funded by the European Research Council. Primary Creators are Peter Stokes and Stewart Brookes, and Geoffroy Noël (King’s College London).

Walters ex Libris

Freising Gospels. Welters ex Libris, W 4, fol. 26 v and rThe Walters recently launched a new website that houses its digital collection of manuscripts: manuscripts.thewalters.org. Featuring a user-friendly design, the site provides visitors with intuitive search options, including the ability to refine their search by date, geography, subject, culture, and more.  Lynley Anne Herbert is the Robert and Nancy Hall Assistant Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts at the Walters. She started working at the museum as a fellow in 2010, and was soon brought on board as a full-time cataloguer of Western manuscripts for the NEH-funded manuscript digitization project. In a series of articles she tells about the work and some of her amazing discoveries

 

The Present Mirrored in the Past: Why Interpreting Medieval Monasticism Matters

 Emilia Jamroziak leeds university medieval monasticismEmilia Jamroziak, Professor of Medieval Religious History and Director of the Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds gave in December 2016 an inaugural lecture at her appointment to professor at the University of Leeds. The lecture has been posted on the website of Leeds University. Read more about Emilia Jamroziak, who is also the new Director of Medieval studies at the University of Leeds. Her research focuses on the interactions between religious institutions, especially Cistercian monasteries and the laity from the early twelfth to the early sixteenth century. Geographically my work spans Britain (particularly the North and Scotland), Central Europe, East-Central Europe and the Baltic.

The Transformation of the Carolingian World. Plurality and Its Limits in Europe, 9th to 12th Century

Archive in Bari, MS. 1. 11th centuryThe decades after the formation of the Carolingian empire around 800 and its territorial expansion to encompass most of Western Europe are correctly seen as a formative period for the emergence of a distinct European culture of Western Christendom. However, research in the last three decades has fundamentally changed the ways in which we perceive the Carolingian achievement. It is no longer a story of the restoration of imperial rule and Christian unity after the Dark Ages between the end of the Roman Empire and its renovation under Charlemagne. Instead, the Rise of the Carolingians is now seen as part of a longer history of cultural and social experimentation, of emulation and innovation, after the end of the Western Roman Empire, in which Carolingian politicians, rulers, bishops, theologians, intellectuals and lawyers built on the diverse social and political experiments of post-Roman societies and polities. The Carolingian reforms did not replace post-Roman multiplicity but integrated the inherited diversity in a new imperial framework. Related project: ‘After Empire’. The related project ‘After Empire: Using and not using the past in the crisis of the Carolingian world, c. 900-c. 1050’ has started in September 2016. The project is funded through HERA, and is run as a joint effort by the Freie Universität Berlin, the Austrian Academy of Sciences, the University of Exeter, the University of St. Andrews, and the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona. .

Problems getting your stuff published?

Reti MedievaliRM Open Archive is an Open Access scholarly repository, sponsored by the Italian Society of Medievalists, which invites its members to deposit publications. The RM Open Archive is a scholarly repository, which covers the whole range of medieval studies: social, economic, political and institutional history, as well as cultural, religious and gender representations and practices. It is open  to contributions from all scholars who want to maximize the net benefits for scientific distribution and access: scholarly publications from all historical disciplines (archaeology, philology, palaeography, diplomatics, fine arts, geography, philosophy, literature etc.), including historical methodology and didactics, are welcomed. RM Open Archive was realised in the frame of the PRIN 2010-2011 project Concepts, Practices and Institutions of a Discipline: Italian Medieval Studies in 19th and 20th Centuries, coordinated by Prof. Roberto Delle Donne at “Federico II” University of Naples. So, join the Society and get published…

Women’s Literary Culture Before the Conquest

Cover of Diane Watt Medieval Women's WritingProfessor Watt has been awarded over £100,000 for her project ‘Women’s Literary Culture Before the Conquest’ which will allow her to examine the literary culture of women in early medieval England. This research will help provide a better understanding of this often overlooked period of English literary history and how it has helped form our rich cultural heritage.

Museé de Cluny Continues rebuilding its Entrance and facilities for Exhibitions and Research

Musee de Cluny in ParisThe National Museum of the Middle Ages, in the heart of Paris, has just launched a new stage in its modernization. The project, called “Cluny 4”, includes renovations, restorations, constructions and above all a complete overhaul of the visiting routes. An ambitious cultural project, which tends to give a second youth to this museum located in the heart of the Latin Quarter of Paris and strengthen its outreach.

Mapping Chaucer

Mapping ChaucerThis website is a companion to Boston College ENGL3393: Chaucer. It may also be used as a general introduction to Geoffrey Chaucer’s poetry. The special areas of focus throughout this website are localization and imagined spaces. The site includes map tours of Chaucer’s life, the frame narrative of the Canterbury Tales, and individual tales. Some pages include a selective bibliography.

 

 

Vikings in the South

Vikings in the South by Ann Christys cover“Vikings” are now raiding the Mediterranean. In the all-out series portraying Ragnar Lodbrog and his sons, Björn Ironside has now reached the Mediterranean while fans of the series continue to grow. Despite some unfortunate inconsistencies (silky bed-linen and interior decoration in “Kattegat”) the series continues to amaze for its dramatic qualities and just plain, old fun…don’t miss the real story about “The Vikings in the South”

 


Vikings are also raiding the Midlands

Vikings at reptonThe Centre for the Study of the Viking Age at the University of Nottingham is pleased to report that they have been awarded a substantial grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Council Follow-On Fund for a project called “Bringing Vikings Back to the East Midlands”. The project will fund a variety of initiatives and events related to the British Museum/York Museums Trust travelling exhibition on the Vikings, which will be on at Lakeside from November 2017 to March 2018. CSVA alumnus Dr Roderick Dale will start as Cultural Engagement Fellow on the project on 1st February. More details to follow.

Flaying the Vikings – myth or reality?

Flaying in the pre modern world - coverBoydell & Brewer has several new books on Medieval History in the pipeline; one of these focus on “Flaying in the Pre Modern World” (Ed by Larissa Tracy). In this Mary R. Rambaran-Olm tells the story of “the Flayed-Dane-Myth”. But other stuff is waiting for those with a gory fantasy…

 

 

 

Brepols: Forthcoming Titles in Winter 2017

Brepols cover of catalogue winter 2016 -2017Eight new books on “Medieval studies” are in the pipeline at Brepols this winter. Highlight – at least for this reader – will be: Historical and Intellectual Culture in the Long Twelfth Century: The Scandinavian Connection. Ed. by Mia Münster-Swendsen et al.

 

 

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